Microsoft Bans All South Korean Kids From Minecraft

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Microsoft Bans All South Korean Kids From Minecraft

South Korean Minecraft fans are in for a shock when the game stops allowing them to play. However, a South Korean law that allows Minecraft accounts to be migrated to Microsoft accounts is now available for younger players.

Why Is Microsoft Banning South Korean Children From Minecraft?

The Yonhap News Agency reported this development. Minecraft is currently migrating accounts from its system to Microsoft’s. However, you must be at least 19 to have a Microsoft account in South Korea.

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This is because of the “Cinderella Law” in the country. To curb gaming addiction and reduce late-night sessions, the law prohibits children younger than 16 from playing video games after midnight.

Microsoft is taking a more radical approach to this issue than other companies that make games. Microsoft decided to ban anyone under 19 from creating a Microsoft account. This will ensure that it doesn’t violate the law.

Many children will be locked out of Minecraft because of Microsoft’s rules when their Minecraft accounts are migrated to Microsoft’s. This has led to anger at both Microsoft’s plans as well as the Cinderella law.

An angry Minecraft fan has started a petition to the government on its website. It has received over 67,000 signatures. The petition’s title is not minced:

The shutdown system has… reduced the rights of underage gamers and related industries. It is also isolating the South Korean market and is merely an administrative rule. The shutdown system must be abolished altogether.

Microsoft spokeswoman said that they plan to implement a “longer-term solution” later in 2021. This should allow both existing and new players (under 19 years old in South Korea) to get back into Minecraft.

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Minecraft Is Mine, Says South Korea’s Youth

Young gamers in South Korea will be banned from Minecraft as their Minecraft accounts become Microsoft ones. Microsoft has a solution that can be implemented quickly to allow kids to get back to what they love.

The ban could be detrimental to more than just the ability of a child to play. It could also affect their desire to learn. Young gamers have many options to get involved in STEM-related Minecraft activities like Hour of Code.